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Now, more than ever, raw and industrial materials are being repurposed to produce art. Artists often trade in the traditional canvas for unconventional and malleable materials because they more easily lend themselves to conceptual aesthetics. The artwork in the exhibitions we are looking at this week in New York City and Paris exemplify this trend.

Hiroyuki Hamada will be on view on October 10 at 138 10th Avenue, New York, NY 10001.

In New York, Lori Bookstein Fine Art will be hosting the second solo exhibition by artist Hiroyuki Hamada (Japanese, b.1968) with a selection of complex sculptures completed between 2011 and 2013. The varied abstract shapes are pieced together using plaster, resin, and waxes, and are incised with intricate patterns that denote systematic units and seemingly congruous relationships. In #73, 2011–2013, blocks of painted resin, akin to the components of architecture, are amassed to form a volumetric shape. The sober, asymmetrical pieces convey the artist’s interest in equilibrium as it relates to shifts in society.

By Karen Vanegas